Navs

Documentation and examples for how to use Grayshift’s included navigation components.

Base nav

Navigation available in Grayshift share general markup and styles, from the base .nav class to the active and disabled states. Swap modifier classes to switch between each style.

The base .nav component is built with flexbox and provide a strong foundation for building all types of navigation components. It includes some style overrides (for working with lists), and basic disabled styling.

The base .nav component does not include any .active state. The following examples include the class, mainly to demonstrate that this particular class does not trigger any special styling.

To convey the active state to assistive technologies, use the aria-current attribute - using the page value for current page, or true for the current item in a set.

<ul class="nav">
  <li class="nav-item">
    <a class="nav-link active" href="#" aria-current="page">Active</a>
  </li>
  <li class="nav-item">
    <a class="nav-link" href="#">Link</a>
  </li>
  <li class="nav-item">
    <a class="nav-link disabled" href="#" tabindex="-1" aria-disabled="true">Disabled</a>
  </li>
</ul>

Classes are used throughout, so your markup can be super flexible. Use <ul>s like above, <ol> if the order of your items is important, or roll your own with a <nav> element. Because the .nav uses display: flex, the nav links behave the same as nav items would, but without the extra markup.

<nav class="nav">
  <a class="nav-link active" href="#" aria-current="page">Active</a>
  <a class="nav-link" href="#">Link</a>
  <a class="nav-link disabled" href="#" tabindex="-1" aria-disabled="true">Disabled</a>
</nav>

Available styles

Change the style of .navs component with modifiers and utilities. Mix and match as needed, or build your own.

Horizontal alignment

Change the horizontal alignment of your nav with flexbox utilities. By default, navs are left-aligned, but you can easily change them to center or right aligned.

Centered with .justify-content-center:

<ul class="nav justify-content-center">
  <li class="nav-item">
    <a class="nav-link active" href="#" aria-current="page">Active</a>
  </li>
  <li class="nav-item">
    <a class="nav-link" href="#">Link</a>
  </li>
  <li class="nav-item">
    <a class="nav-link disabled" href="#" tabindex="-1" aria-disabled="true">Disabled</a>
  </li>
</ul>

Right-aligned with .justify-content-end:

<ul class="nav justify-content-end">
  <li class="nav-item">
    <a class="nav-link active" href="#" aria-current="page">Active</a>
  </li>
  <li class="nav-item">
    <a class="nav-link" href="#">Link</a>
  </li>
  <li class="nav-item">
    <a class="nav-link disabled" href="#" tabindex="-1" aria-disabled="true">Disabled</a>
  </li>
</ul>

Vertical

Stack your navigation by changing the flex item direction with the .flex-column utility. Need to stack them on some viewports but not others? Use the responsive versions (e.g., .flex-sm-column).

<ul class="nav flex-column">
  <li class="nav-item">
    <a class="nav-link active" href="#" aria-current="page">Active</a>
  </li>
  <li class="nav-item">
    <a class="nav-link" href="#">Link</a>
  </li>
  <li class="nav-item">
    <a class="nav-link disabled" href="#" tabindex="-1" aria-disabled="true">Disabled</a>
  </li>
</ul>

As always, vertical navigation is possible without <ul>s, too.

<nav class="nav flex-column">
  <a class="nav-link active" href="#" aria-current="page">Active</a>
  <a class="nav-link" href="#">Link</a>
  <a class="nav-link disabled" href="#" tabindex="-1" aria-disabled="true">Disabled</a>
</nav>

Tabs

Takes the basic nav from above and adds the .nav-tabs class to generate a tabbed interface. Use them to create tabbable regions with our tab JavaScript plugin.

<ul class="nav nav-tabs nav-justified">
  <li class="nav-item">
    <a class="nav-link active" href="#" aria-current="page">Active</a>
  </li>
  <li class="nav-item">
    <a class="nav-link" href="#">Link</a>
  </li>
  <li class="nav-item">
    <a class="nav-link disabled" href="#" tabindex="-1" aria-disabled="true">Disabled</a>
  </li>
</ul>

Pills

Similar to the tabs example, but with .nav-pills class.

<ul class="nav nav-pills">
  <li class="nav-item">
    <a class="nav-link active" href="#" aria-current="page">Active</a>
  </li>
  <li class="nav-item">
    <a class="nav-link" href="#">Link</a>
  </li>
  <li class="nav-item">
    <a class="nav-link disabled" href="#" tabindex="-1" aria-disabled="true">Disabled</a>
  </li>
</ul>

Fill and justify

Force your .nav's contents to extend the full available width one of two modifier classes. To proportionately fill all available space with your .nav-items, use .nav-fill. Notice that all horizontal space is occupied, but not every nav item has the same width.

<ul class="nav nav-pills nav-fill">
  <li class="nav-item">
    <a class="nav-link active" href="#" aria-current="page">Active</a>
  </li>
  <li class="nav-item">
    <a class="nav-link" href="#">Link</a>
  </li>
  <li class="nav-item">
    <a class="nav-link disabled" href="#" tabindex="-1" aria-disabled="true">Disabled</a>
  </li>
</ul>

When using a <nav>-based navigation, you can safely omit .nav-item as only .nav-link is required for styling <a> elements.

<nav class="nav nav-pills nav-fill">
  <a class="nav-link active" href="#" aria-current="page">Active</a>
  <a class="nav-link" href="#">Link</a>
  <a class="nav-link disabled" href="#" tabindex="-1" aria-disabled="true">Disabled</a>
</nav>

For equal-width elements, use .nav-justified. All horizontal space will be occupied by nav links, but unlike the .nav-fill above, every nav item will be the same width.

<ul class="nav nav-pills nav-justified">
  <li class="nav-item">
    <a class="nav-link active" href="#" aria-current="page">Active</a>
  </li>
  <li class="nav-item">
    <a class="nav-link" href="#">Link</a>
  </li>
  <li class="nav-item">
    <a class="nav-link disabled" href="#" tabindex="-1" aria-disabled="true">Disabled</a>
  </li>
</ul>

Similar to the .nav-fill example using a <nav>-based navigation.

<nav class="nav nav-pills nav-justified">
  <a class="nav-link active" href="#" aria-current="page">Active</a>
  <a class="nav-link" href="#">Link</a>
  <a class="nav-link disabled" href="#" tabindex="-1" aria-disabled="true">Disabled</a>
</nav>

Regarding accessibility

If you’re using navs to provide a navigation bar, be sure to add a role="navigation" to the most logical parent container of the <ul>, or wrap a <nav> element around the whole navigation. Do not add the role to the <ul> itself, as this would prevent it from being announced as an actual list by assistive technologies.

Note that navigation bars, even if visually styled as tabs with the .nav-tabs class, should not be given role="tablist", role="tab" or role="tabpanel" attributes. These are only appropriate for dynamic tabbed interfaces, as described in the WAI ARIA Authoring Practices. See JavaScript behavior for dynamic tabbed interfaces in this section for an example. The aria-current attribute is not necessary on dynamic tabbed interfaces since our JavaScript handles the selected state by adding aria-selected="true" on the active tab.

JavaScript behavior

Use the tab JavaScript plugin to extend our navigational tabs and pills to create tabbable panes of local content.

Dynamic tabbed interfaces, as described in the WAI ARIA Authoring Practices, require role="tablist", role="tab", role="tabpanel", and additional aria- attributes in order to convey their structure, functionality and current state to users of assistive technologies (such as screen readers).

Note that dynamic tabbed interfaces should not contain dropdown menus, as this causes both usability and accessibility issues. From a usability perspective, the fact that the currently displayed tab’s trigger element is not immediately visible (as it’s inside the closed dropdown menu) can cause confusion. From an accessibility point of view, there is currently no sensible way to map this sort of construct to a standard WAI ARIA pattern, meaning that it cannot be easily made understandable to users of assistive technologies.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

<ul class="nav nav-tabs nav-justified" role="tablist">
  <li class="nav-item">
    <a class="nav-link active" data-toggle="tab" href="#tabOne" role="tab" aria-controls="tabOne" aria-selected="true">Tab</a>
  </li>
  <li class="nav-item">
    <a class="nav-link" data-toggle="tab" href="#tabTwo" role="tab" aria-controls="tabTwo" aria-selected="false">Tab</a>
  </li>
  <li class="nav-item">
    <a class="nav-link" data-toggle="tab" href="#tabThree" role="tab" aria-controls="tabThree" aria-selected="false">Tab</a>
  </li>
</ul>
<div class="tab-content">
  <div class="tab-pane fade show active" id="tabOne" role="tabpanel"></div>
  <div class="tab-pane fade" id="tabTwo" role="tabpanel"></div>
  <div class="tab-pane fade" id="tabThree" role="tabpanel"></div>
</div>

To help fit your needs, this works with <ul>-based markup, as shown above, or with any arbitrary “roll your own” markup. Note that if you’re using <nav>, you shouldn’t add role="tablist" directly to it, as this would override the element’s native role as a navigation landmark. Instead, switch to an alternative element (in the example below, a simple <div>) and wrap the <nav> around it.

<nav>
  <div class="nav nav-tabs nav-justified" role="tablist">
    <a class="nav-link active" data-toggle="tab" href="#navTabOne" role="tab" aria-controls="navTabOne" aria-selected="true">Tab</a>
    <a class="nav-link" data-toggle="tab" href="#navTabTwo" role="tab" aria-controls="navTabTwo" aria-selected="false">Tab</a>
    <a class="nav-link" data-toggle="tab" href="#navTabThree" role="tab" aria-controls="navTabThree" aria-selected="false">Tab</a>
  </div>
</nav>
<div class="tab-content">
  <div class="tab-pane fade show active" id="navTabOne" role="tabpanel"></div>
  <div class="tab-pane fade" id="navTabTwo" role="tabpanel"></div>
  <div class="tab-pane fade" id="navTabThree" role="tabpanel"></div>
</div>

The tabs plugin also works with pills.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

<ul class="nav nav-pills nav-justified" role="tablist">
  <li class="nav-item">
    <a class="nav-link active" data-toggle="tab" href="#pillsTabOne" role="tab" aria-controls="pillsTabOne" aria-selected="true">Tab</a>
  </li>
  <li class="nav-item">
    <a class="nav-link" data-toggle="tab" href="#pillsTabTwo" role="tab" aria-controls="pillsTabTwo" aria-selected="false">Tab</a>
  </li>
  <li class="nav-item">
    <a class="nav-link" data-toggle="tab" href="#pillsTabThree" role="tab" aria-controls="pillsTabThree" aria-selected="false">Tab</a>
  </li>
</ul>
<div class="tab-content">
  <div class="tab-pane fade show active" id="pillsTabOne" role="tabpanel"></div>
  <div class="tab-pane fade" id="pillsTabTwo" role="tabpanel"></div>
  <div class="tab-pane fade" id="pillsTabThree" role="tabpanel"></div>
</div>

Fade effect

To make tabs fade in, add .fade to each .tab-pane. The first tab pane must also have .show to make the initial content visible.

<div class="tab-content">
  <div class="tab-pane fade show active" id="tabOne" role="tabpanel"></div>
  <div class="tab-pane fade" id="tabTwo" role="tabpanel"></div>
  <div class="tab-pane fade" id="tabThree" role="tabpanel"></div>
</div>